The only real prison is fear, and the only real freedom is freedom from fear.

The title of this post comes from the amazing pro-democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. She was released from house arrest today amid massive cheers from the people of Burma (Myanmar). This is wonderful news, but we have to keep in mind that this is less about bringing democracy to Burma and more about the ruling military junta there giving themselves some positive publicity after their much criticized elections.

Aung San Suu Kyi was born on June 19th, 1945. Her father Aung San founded the modern Burmese army and negotiated Burma’s independence from the British Empire in 1947. Unforunately, he was assassinated by his rivals in the same year. Aung San Suu Kyi became head of the Burmese National League for Democracy in 1988, opposing the military government of Burma (Myanmar). She was awarded the 1990 Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought and the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize for her human rights work.

In honor of her freedom, I decided to share some of my favorite quotes from this beautiful, intelligent and strong woman.

“It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it. Most Burmese are familiar with the four a-gati, the four kinds of corruption. Chanda-gati, corruption induced by desire, is deviation from the right path in pursuit of bribes or for the sake of those one loves. Dosa-gati is taking the wrong path to spite those against whom one bears ill will, and moga-gati is aberration due to ignorance. But perhaps the worst of the four is bhaya-gati, for not only does bhaya, fear, stiƒle and slowly destroy all sense of right and wrong, it so often lies at the root of the other three kinds of corruption. Just as chanda-gati, when not the result of sheer avarice, can be caused by fear of want or fear of losing the goodwill of those one loves, so fear of being surpassed, humiliated or injured in some way can provide the impetus for ill will. And it would be difficult to dispel ignorance unless there is freedom to pursue the truth unfettered by fear. With so close a relationship between fear and corruption it is little wonder that in any society where fear is rife corruption in all forms becomes deeply entrenched.”

“Within a system which denies the existence of basic human rights, fear tends to be the order of the day. Fear of imprisonment, fear of torture, fear of death, fear of losing friends, family, property or means of livelihood, fear of poverty, fear of isolation, fear of failure. A most insidious form of fear is that which masquerades as common sense or even wisdom, condemning as foolish, reckless, insignificant or futile the small, daily acts of courage which help to preserve man’s self-respect and inherent human dignity. It is not easy for a people conditioned by fear under the iron rule of the principle that might is right to free themselves from the enervating miasma of fear. Yet even under the most crushing state machinery courage rises up again and again, for fear is not the natural state of civilized man.”

“We have faith in the power to change what needs to be changed but we are under no illusion that the transition from dictatorship to liberal democracy will be easy, or that democratic government will mean the end of all our problems. We know that our greatest challenges lie ahead of us and that our struggle to establish a stable, democratic society will continue beyond our own life span. But we know that we are not alone. The cause of liberty and justice finds sympathetic responses around the world. Thinking and feeling people everywhere, regardless of color or creed, understand the deeply rooted human need for a meaningful existence that goes beyond the mere gratification of material desires. Those fortunate enough to live in societies where they are entitled to full political rights can reach out to help their less fortunate brethren in other areas of our troubled planet.”

“I don’t believe in people just hoping. We work for what we want. I always say that one has no right to hope without endeavor, so we work to try and bring about the situation that is necessary for the country, and we are confident that we will get to the negotiation table at one time or another.”

“Saints, it has been said, are the sinners who go on trying. So free men and women are the oppressed who go on trying and who in the process make themselves fit to bear the responsibilities and uphold the disciplines which will maintain a free society.”

The Burmese struggle for democracy and freedom continues to be in my thoughts and prayers. Please keep them in yours.

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About bodhipunk

Just another anarcho-commie dhamma punk.

Posted on 11/13/2010, in burma, politics, stories. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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